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, the nsa came underfire in the senate judiciary committee, republicans and democrats raising serious questions about the big phone spying program of nsa. we'll bring you up to date on that and a whole lot more right here on current tv. (vo) current tv gets the conversation started weekdays at 9 eastern. >> i'm a slutty bob hope. the troops love me. tv and radio talk show host stephanie miller rounds out current's morning news block. you're welcome current tv audience for the visual candy. (vo) sharp tongue. >>excuse me? (vo) quick wit. >> and yes, president obama does smell like cookies and freedom. (vo) and above all, opinion and attitude. >> really?! this is the kind of they just pulled freshly from their [bleep]. >> you know what those people are like. >> what could possibly go wrong in eight years of george bush? >> my producer just coughed up a hairball. >>sorry. >>just be grateful current tv doesn't come in "smell-o-vision" >> oh come on! the sweatshirt is nice and all, but i could use a golden lasso. (vo)only on current tv. cenk off air>>> alright in 15 minutes we're going to
have posted and explanations. so i will talk to you very thatly about the nsa, and is something i have been very involved with, trying to rein in the out-of-control nature of what is going on right now with our surveillance programs, and that is something that i have spent, as you have probably seen from the news, a lot of time doing over the past couple of months. doing himsa has been as has been declassified now, is collecting the phone records of every single person in the united states, regardless of whether you are under suspicion of anything, so, in other words, the nsa has a database, and they actually collect every time you call someone. they collect the call that was made. they tell you which numbers were connected, the duration of the call, and they keep other sorts onwhat they call metadata your calls. they have been doing this for quite some time, but it was thently disclosed, and problem, of course, is they are doing it without any suspicion. it does not matter if you have a connection to a terrorist or not. they decided that they have the authority to gather up everyone's
is not a fan of big government, i share many of those worries. i'm asked constantly about the n.s.a. stuff. i don't know enough of what's going on. but i have this guttural reaction where, no, i don't want my data scooped up vs. the analytical counterterrorism side of me saying, i want their data scooped up. there is something to be had there, a conversation to be had there. i just say that, you know, when you have that conversation, you shouldn't let it -- and i don't think you guys do this, but some people i think now are defining the current threat environment and how things are evolving around the globe with the impetus to wrap this up because they want to declare it over and an end to it. s there's a danger that you go too far in your thinking in that and think you're just going to say it's all over with because i don't want to deal with it anymore. the bottom line is our enemy gets a vote. >> we covered a lot of ground. but there's obviously still a lot of ground we could cover. let me thank our two panelists very much. [applause] and thank you all for coming and i hope to to see you ag
for joining us bright and early. another nsa spying bombshell. not only did they break thousands of laws while watching americans, but they claim they did it all by mistake. this is the scandal that keeps getting worse. we'll explain it. >> muslim groups planning a million muslim march set to take place on, get, this 9/11. why? because they say they are the real victims of that attack. >> clayton: take a look at this. a woman not doing any favor to her genders. repeated attempted to exit the garage. ms. al con camerota. it goes on for liar like a minute. she gets out. yeah. that's not going to work. does this prove that women can't drive? we're going to debate it next. "fox & friends" begins right now. hi. my name is alexandra, you are watching my favorite show. "fox & friends." >> alisyn: that's my daughter. >> is it really her favorite show? >> alisyn: it is her favorite show but i would never let her watch it. >> clayton: sounds like a character from the disney show. >> alisyn: i didn't know she recorded that my 8-year-old daughter is with us today she asleep at the moment. >> clayton: it's
to that new "the washington post" report concerning the nsa. the report says the nsa broke privacy rules or overstep its legal authority thousands of time each year since 2008. >>> it's not a problem. it worked. if you have 99.9% compliance and so few reporting errors this came from an internal report which then becomes part of an overall ig report. i'm on the intelligence committee. i'm satisfied we're told. >> the problem and there is a real problem with the system. it's a black box, the fisa court is a secret tribunal issuing secret opinions making secret law and a lot of it completely unavailable to members even of the foreign intelligence committee. >> those documents published by the "the washington post" were leaked by edward snowden. >>> this weekend has been a wash out in parts of the south. heavy rains flooded several streets in north carolina and more rain is expected through the weekend. will it end? when is the question. we have more on that. >> we're still keeping an eye on the rain up and down the east coast. it's streaming in off the gulf of mexico and the southeast will
-- >> the philosophical objection to all the nsa programs is that you don't want the government. everyone knows that amazon has all of your information. so does, you know, your online grocer who takes your food order every week. this is about the federal government having too much information and too much control over their lives. >> like they don't have it already. >> as a stout nra member, i'm upset to know they may know what i'm doing, how i'm doing, what i'm doing with i many guns. >> where you keep them in your east hampton cottage. >> east hampton, it's ammo city out there. >> yes, i just heard from someone, a concerned viewer that when we say guns, we're not talking about your biceps. >> oh, there you go. >> okay. talking of surveillance. government programs. >> we want to see them today. you have three hours for you to reveal your guns. >> no, no, no. >> this is marketing. marketing is for the consumer's needs. obviously there's a consumer need out there to see the biceps. so we will, as marketers, as journalists. yes, that will happen at 8:00. >> it won't. i promise you, it really won'
strike fighter program, and then a senior contributor for defense on his article on what the nsa were charged probably looks like, all of that tomorrow morning beginning at 7:00 a.m. on c-span and c-span radio, and tomorrow, a two -- they bus to her, talking about college costs syracuse, newin york, that will be live on c- hall is backe town tomorrow night. we start at 7:00 30 eastern, and education will be the education will be the focus. we hope you join us tomorrow night for c-span townhall. >> season two of first ladies begins monday, september 9 with a look at the life of edith roosevelt. all this month, we show you encore presentations of season one. every weeknight at 9:00 p.m. eastern, tonight it is lucretia garfield. ♪ >> it's only in recent years that a lot of scholarship has focused on the fact that their marriage was in its early phases. >> i think in the early years, james found her a bit distant and cold. as the years went by, she had a tremendous influence on him. >> they spent a lot of time on their children. they thought that education was an emancipating factor. >>
to provide temporary asylum to the nsa leaker, edward snowden, or even russia's high-profile arrest recently of a u.s. diplomat who they have accused of being a cia spy and who they perp walked to a great effect. it's not even just russia's decision to ban american couples from adopting russian children. it's also russia's recent spate of anti-gay legislation which has drawn lots of criticism from the west, and some calls that the world should boycott the upcoming winter olympics that are due to be held in russia next year. >> i know that one question that's been raised is how do we approach the olympics? i want to just make very clear right now i do not think it's appropriate to boycott the olympics. we've got a bunch of americans out there who are training hard, who are doing everything they can to succeed. nobody's more offended than me by some of the anti-gay and lesbian legislation you've been seeing in russia, but as i said just this week, i've spoken out against that not just with respect to russia, but a number of other countries where we continue to do work with them but have a stro
the nsa, snowden, what's the future of privacy and security issues? guest: this congress is going to take them up. we saw representtive rutchersburger was telling us yesterday before they headed home and they had a meeting at the white house to talk about the nsa that there appears to be an appetite for some type of additional layers of oversight. but we're going to see intel committee members and leadership, both parties on both sides of the building defending that nsa program. they're the people who get to read and see the things that are class fid that the rest of us don't and keep insisting the program is important and needs to be there. it will be a little bit of a fight, a disagreement moving forward. host: rod is next. caller: i had a question about congressman watt and the likelihood of him getting full enate confirmation to head the fhfa and what's so important about mel watt getting full senate confirmation? guest: i haven't been following that appointment very closely. we just saw some real stickler appointments going through the senate. he members of the nlrb, some in the e.p.
an amendment that would bar the nsa from using funds to collect phone and data records from citizens not subject to an investigation. the amendment which was opposed by house leader john boehner in the white house was defeated by a vote of 205-217. this town hall held in marshall michigan is just over an hour. [applause] >> hello everyone. he is my chief of staff. he doesn't just work for me so if you have questions or concerns here in the district you can always reach ben. he is primarily in my grand rapids office my main district office. you can find that on my web site. we have a satellite office in battle creek so if there is something you would like to schedule or an appointment you would like to schedule contact her grand rapids office so we can make sure we have someone down here to meet with u.s. well in calhoun county. by district director is not here today but he is also a valuable resource. if you want to contact my grand rapids office to reach him please feel free to do so. he is always around except for today but for a good cause he is not here today. but, he is a great
the nsa a is not operating these microphones clearly. [laughter] or maybe barack obama is. that's a good point. it's wonderful to be here tonight. wonderful to be here at the steam boat institute. i think it's long past time that the aspen institute got a doze of truth and reality and facts. [applause] and we're thrilled to be part of that effort here tonight. we thought we would do a cup of things. we want to talk about current events, but the most important current event in our lives in our family has been the fact that my dad was bless -- we were all blessed. my dad was a recipient a of new heart a little over a year ago. [applause] and his story, you know, he talked about his first campaign for office when he was elected, and 1967, when i was running the first time was also the first time he had a heart attack, and i've been going back for reasons you can imagine looking at some old news clippings about political campaigns in wyoming, and came across one where my dad was asked about his heart attack in 1978. after he had the attack and decided he was going stay in the race he was int
i concerns about this technology. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology bit.could be abused a i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are
broad new powers in 2008. "the washington post" made the analysis after getting documents from former n.s.a. analyst edward snoweden, now congress is getting involved. short time ago we talked with a reporter fouling this story. -- following this story. >> we are joined by jenifer martinez of the hill. why is judiciary committee chairman patrick leahy calling for another round of hearings on the n.s.a.? >> he's doing that in the wake of report that was published by "the washington post" late thursday, that n.s.a. had repeatedly broken privacy rules or overstepped its authority for years. soleil he came out today with -- so lie he came out with a statement today saying he remains concerned that congress is still not getting straightforward answers from the n.s.a., so he hopes to hold another hearing when congress returns to get these answers. >> how bad was this report that the "washington post" published on thursday? > it's definitely pret i damning. ust adds -- it would put the administration in even worse position than it was with the surveillance program. it also calls into question the
because of edward snowden an the nsa leaks. basically information on what we're doing to try to stop the next terrorist attack against americans. this is pretty explosive stuff. >> yeah. i mean this is increasing, the third rail of american politics, "the washington post" obtained new details about what it describes as a black budget for u.s. spy agencies. here are some of the revelations. the u.s. has spent more than half a trillion dollars on national intelligence programs following the 9/11 attacks. that number includes all 16 spy agencies. for the 2013 fiscal year alone, $52 billion was allocated for the program with the cry gettiag most at $14.7 billion as requested. according to the "washington post" despite the massive dollars spent on the programs, the agencies repain unable to provide critical information to the president on a range of national security. threats. also raising eyebrows from the report the u.s. intelligence lumps israel in with hostile foes like iran, cuba, china and russia as a key target for u.s. counter intelligence efforts. it's amazing how much money sinc
obama spoke about a range of issues including surveillance programs at nsa and u.s./russian relations. this is about 55 minutes. >> good afternoon. these have a seat. over the past few weeks thomas i've been talking about what i believe should be our number one priority in the country. building a better bargain for the middle class and for americans who want to work your way into the middle class. at the same time i am focused on my number one priority -- keeping the american people safe. been reminded once again about the threats to our nation. as i said at the national defense university, and meeting those threats we have to strike the right balance between protecting our security and our freedoms. as part of this rebalancing, i called for review of our surveillance programs. unfortunately, rather than orderly and lawful process, the , repeated leaks of classified information has initiated the debate in a very passionate but not always informed way. i held a healthy skepticism of these programs as a senator and as president i have taken steps to make sure that they have strong overs
of nsa leaker edward snowden. u.s. spy agencies will spend nearly $53 billion this year, but according to never before seen documents, they're still failing to provide the president with critical information about national security threats. >>> the wife of rocker ted nugent arrested at the airport after security agents found a gun in her carry-on bag. she was taken into custody. "dalling morning news" says she simply forgot the gun was in her bag and called it an honest mistake. she has a concealed handgun license. >>> a new warning on the caps of extra strength tylenol bottles. cnn's alison kosik joins us with more on this story. good morning, alison. >> good morning, carol. what is this new tylenol bottle going to look like. this new cap that has a big, bright, red warning. the warning will say, contains ac acetaminoph acetaminophen. on extra strength tylenol bottles beginning in october. the funny thing is the bottles already have a warning. tylenol is getting you to read the warning because overdosing on acetaminophen is one of the most common poisonings in the world, but did you k
fighter program. art probably nsa ch looks like. "washington journal" is live every day as 7 a.m. eastern. >> let's begin with a very well- known novelist. what brought you? thiswas born a negro in country and welcome deeply. there was no reason not to be involved what is considered the most important and most noted demonstration to free americans. until recently, like most americans, i have expressed my support of civil rights by talking largely about at cocktail parties. summer,y americans this i could no longer pay lip service to a cause that was urgently right and in a time that is so urgently now. tvsunday, american history marks the 50th anniversary of the march on washington with historic and contemporary roundtable discussions. we will have a visit to that gallery, a theater performance of the 1960s civil rights movements. it starts at 1 p.m. eastern, part of american history tv come every weekend on c-span 3. next is a discussion about the state of the u.s. economy with a former white house economic adviser and the ceo of him co-, the largest bond fund in the world, and chairman
supporting the ousted president there. repeated violations of privacy rules by the nsa thomas calling for operations of the program. at a state justice in pennsylvania has blocked a voter id law there. this is in time for the november 5 special election. journal," ahington three-hour program for you. our first 45 minutes is looking at politics, looking to you specifically on this topic am a who best represents your political party? the rnc concluding its summer meeting, talking about its future as far as 2016 is concerned. visits to iowa by joe biden. for the first 45 minutes we want to hear from the people that best represents your political party. divided the lines by political party. if you want to give us a tweet on this topic you can send that our way@c-spanwj. send us an e-mail at journal@c- span.org. couple ofurred by a different things. "the wall street journal" has a new writeup about the rnc meeting. the head of the rnc talked a little bit about the 2016 strategy. in this write up this morning, he said -- that ist abt the strategy on the republican side. on the democratic s
was the nsa and their search of the american e-mail and the compiling of metadata about the phone calls of americans. collects relations have come to light recently that there were times when the line was crossed. that demonstrates that those mechanisms were in place and the court ruling that that program was unconstitutional in 2011 and setting it aside and ending it was another example of how the process works. we have to continue to focus on striking that balance. >> missile controversy seems to have done something that a lot of people were not thought possible. that is forging a common ground between the libertarians and the liberal side of the democratic party. you get a sense that this is going to be the kind of the finding issue going forward that may be, say, the iraq war was? >> i do not have a sense that this will be a defining issue in that way. as is particularly because unlike the iraq war, where president bush was in office and very affirmatively differed with the democratic base and with face of the entire country where most americans felt that with the wrong war at the w
of tennessee. she's also chair of the judicial conference of the nsa's committee on the budget, and so is well and deeply first and funding issues faced by the court and can answer i believe many of the implicit questions raised in the opening statement from both myself and senator sessions. judge gibbons, please proceed. >> chairman coons, senator sessions, members of the subcommittee, i appear before you as chair of the judicial conference committee on the budget. the judiciary very much appreciates the invitation to discuss the financial crisis facing the courts. senator coons, i am pleased that judge is a known circuit are here today. i see judge ted mickey. there's the judge from your home state. the third circuit itself -- as rest of the judiciary but it's within the circuit coordination and efforts to address the current crisis has been stellar. i also would like to recognize judge john bates right here behind me, the new director of the administrative office of the court who comes after serving on the d.c. federal district court. the $350 million, 5% across the board sequestration cuts
nation's surveillance programs have helped thwart terrorist attacks because of the n.s.a. and f.b.i. personnel who work on these activities every day and working hard to comply with the law to protect our constitutional liberties and keep america safe. and contrast to the efforts of those hardworking, law-abidinging personnel, americans have serious reservations about attorney general holder and clapper who have -- who are ultimately responsible for the management of these programs. we remain gravely concerned about their lack to follow the law, be forthright with the american people and congress, and commitment to protect our actually guaranteed liberties. continued congressional oversight coupled with the terminations of clapper and holder will help restore these fight terrorism without compromising our liberties or creating gaps in our intelligence structure. in addition the removal may start the healing process to restore america's trust in our federal government. thank you, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from
the relationship, especially in light of what has happened with edward snowden and the nsa that relationship between the foreign spacing components of the american government, and its relationship to owners and operators of critical infrastructure who traditionally operate domestically. >> there are a few trend that are important, underpinnings of your question. first of all, over the last decade, increasingly the department of defense relies on facilities here in the united states in order to operate our forces abroad, and so when you look at the dependence of dod facilities, military bases here, on privately owned infrastructure, especially the electric grid, you can see the imperative for dod to be able to partner effectively, not only with industry to assure the flow of those vital electricity services, but of course also with the department of energy and the department of homeland security, which will always be in the lead for the federal government. never the department of defense force these kinds of issues. so, building industry collaboration under the leadership and the federal team
between the two countries had been going south for awhile. russia's decision to grant asylum to nsa leaker edward snowden appears to be the final straw. >> major issues were not teed up to make significant progress on the level of a president-to-president summit. >> the russians responded by saying washington failed to develop relations with moscow on an equal basis. >>> the feds are again alerting local law enforcement across the country to be on the lookout for terror plots in the preplanning stages. that message coming in a bulletin late last night. the fbi and department of homeland security also repeating that they're not aware of any specific threat on u.s. soil. >>> syrians caught up in a brutal civil war are about to get more help from the united states. president obama has announced an additional $195 million in humanitarian and food aid for the syrian people. that brings the total amount of u.s. aid to syria to more than $1 billion since the fighting began two years ago. the announcement coincides with the muslim holiday which marks the end of the holy month of ramadan. >>> and f
. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology that could be abused a bit. i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are on the line. i understand your c
of the recent nsa disclosures that we're learning about is, you know, if you don't have members of congress and the u.s., the american people knowing about what the government is doing and the kind of extraordinary power they want to make the country safe, then, you know, you do risk the sense this will just be the kind of permanent war that will never end, and you will never be able to grapple, and that creates a national security bureaucracy. but that said, the idea that you just want to -- you know, if you were to say that we should repeal that aumf, then you would effectively be saying you don't think there currently is a war, and as tom said, the enemy gets a vote, and they're still at war with us. that's kind of where i'm at. >> let me just throw into the discussion, i'm pretty sure president obama suggested before the closing of the diplomatic outposts that the authorization for the use of military force, that congress should consider repealing it. but again, that -- >> or modifying it. >> or modifying it. very different, i guess. the idea of repealing it would be based on the narrat
on the climate. >> host: what about the nsa issue that nfacing? >> guest: it's an interesting issue that concerns me but interesting that when i'm home i don't hear it much. i hear it from a small group of people but when i'm at the coffee shop that one doesn't come up. the irs one comes up a lot of though. >> host: jake in massachusetts on the independent line the republican of nebraska is the guest. >> caller: people think they need to make a lot more money than they should. in that case they should get a good tax credit to the people working good full-time jobs but not making a bunch of money. so, people would want to get a part-time job but not such a great job. it would put more money in their pockets at. and i notice when people get their tax returns and what not, they put all that money back and buy a new tv or read a4a pity the the what help the economy. it's just i talk to people and they think they should be making 20 or $30 an hour because they think they deserve that. but really what i think is if they give a good tax break to the part-time and the people who may be are making the $40
every website every american goes to? must be the n.s.a. i attended a classified briefing, i can't go into anything there, but it appeared before the briefing very clear to me and i still feel this way, that when you blind yourself as to who the enemy is, as we have, purging all kinds of material from our f.b.i. training materials, state department, intelligence materials, as to who radical islamists really are and what they believe, you blind our law enforcement, our security people from the ability to see your enemy. we're not protected. when you have an open border where people are coming across at will and border patrolmen have told us three to four times faster than they ever have since we started talking about handing out legal status to anybody who happened to be here by a certain date, all this talk about amnesty, citizenship, all these other things, do they get benefits? not get benefits? all this talk has increased the number of people coming in by about three to five times. the border is not secure. when you don't control what kind of terrorists may be coming into your coun
the relationship especially in light of what's happened with edward snowden and the nsa, that relationship with, between the foreign-facing come poems, the national security facing come poems of the american be government and its relationship to owners and operators of critical infrastructure who traditionally operate domestically? >> well, there are two trends, scott, that are important. upside pinnings of your -- underpinnings of your question. first of all, oh the last decade -- over the last decade increasing lu the department of defense relies on facilities here in the united states in order to operate our forces abroad. and so when you look at the dependence of dod facilities, military bases here on privately-owned infrastructure, especially the electric grid for purposes of today, you can see the imperative for dod to be able to partner effectively not only with industry to assure the flow of those vital electricity services, but, of course, also with the department of energy and the department of homeland security which will always be with in the lead for the federal government, never t
-span.org. he was also asked about the nsa surveillance program. >> each night this weekend c-span2, while congress is on break, we're showing on four presentations of q&a. today, nobel peace prize winner jody williams. she won the prize in 1997 for her efforts towards a worldwide ban on landmines. then at 8 p.m. eastern booktv prime time. tonight, the focus is on what booktv viewers are reading this summer. >> over this congressional recess, the service employees international union is lobbying to convince congress to pass immigration reform. this morning from washington to talk with one of the union's leaders about why they're doing that. this is about half an hour. >> host: our focus is immigration and our guest is eliseo medina who is the secretary-treasurer of the service employees international union. thanks so much for being with us. >> guest: thank you so much for having me. >> host: as a look at the debate over immigration and it is front and center in the august recess as members of congress traveled to the respective states and congressional districts, what do you think the immi
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)